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Concussion

Code 3 ER Urgent Care Concussion

A concussion is a form of brain injury caused by a blow to the head. Loss of consciousness sometimes also occurs but concussions can occur without loss of consciousness. Recent studies as well as several high profile professional athletes have called attention to the serious nature of concussions. Even a minor bump on the head can be serious.

Symptoms Reported by Athlete:

  • Headache or Pressure in Head
  • Nausea or Vomiting
  • Balance Problems or Dizziness
  • Double or Blurry Vision
  • Sensitivity to Light
  • Sensitivity to Noise
  • Feeling Sluggish, Hazy, Foggy, or Groggy
  • Concentration or Memory Problems
  • Confusion
  • Just Not Feeling Right or “Feeling Down”

Signs Observed by Parents

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets an instruction
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes

Danger Signs:

Be alert for symptoms that worsen over time. Your child
or teen should be seen in an emergency department right
away if he or she has:

  • One pupil (the black part in the middle of the eye)
    larger than the other
  • Drowsiness or cannot be awakened
  • A headache that gets worse and does not go away
  • Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Slurred speech
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • Difficulty recognizing people or places
  • Increasing confusion, restlessness, or agitation
  • Unusual behavior
  • Loss of consciousness (even a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously)

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU THINK YOUR CHILD HAS A CONCUSSION?

  • SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION RIGHT AWAY
    A health care professional will be able to decide how serious the concussion is and when it is safe for your child to return to regular activities, including sports.
  • KEEP YOUR CHILD OUT OF PLAY.
    Concussions take time to heal. Don’t let your child return to play the day of the injury and until a health care professional says it’s OK. Children who return to play too soon – while the brain is still healing – risk a greater chance of having a second concussion. Repeat or later concussions can be very serious. They can cause permanent brain damage, affecting your child for a lifetime.
  • TELL YOUR CHILD’S COACH ABOUT
    ANY PREVIOUS CONCUSSION.

    Coaches should know if your child had a previous concussion. Your child’s coach may not know about a concussion your child received in another sport or activity unless you tell the coach.